Start: Baie Fine, East End before entering the channel to the pool. 0927
End: Little Current Town Docks, 1459
Total Distance: 22.4 nm
Time: 5:31
Average Speed: 4.4 kts

We were rudely awoken at 5:00 am this morning to rain coming in through the window.  Which meant two things.  One:  I was heading out topsides in my underwear to close the

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We only move when the weather is gloomy

windows.  Because there was no one around so why not.  And two, because it was bad weather, it was a travel day for us.  Pretty sure there is a correlation between bad weather and east winds (which is the way we want to go), but I failed meteorology in college.  Just kidding…failed lots of things, but since I never took meteorology, I couldn’t fail it!We were rudely awoken at 5:00 am this morning to rain coming in through the window.  Which meant two things.  One:  I was heading out topsides in my underwear to close the windows.  Because there was no one around so why not.  And two, because it was bad weather, it was a travel day for us.  Pretty sure there is a correlation between bad weather and east winds (which is the way we want to go), but I failed meteorology in college.  Just kidding…failed lots of things, but since I never took meteorology, I couldn’t fail it!
Our trip was about 22 miles and would take about 4ish hours.  And we weren’t in a hurry.  So we puttered along, and eventually put up the genoa, turned off the engines and sailed quietly towards Little Current.

 

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Sailing. Like it!

And damned if we weren’t sailing too fast.  Which is an ironic problem.  Our ETA went from 2:45, to 1:50, to 1:00.  We ended up tacking back and forth to burn off some time prior to the bridge.
At 1400, our appointed time, we were outside the bridge.  And waiting.  It finally opened at 1405ish and we were through.  Little Current is kind of a misnomer.  If you read ‘Active Captain,’ (a website that talks about all things boating, like marinas, anchorages, etc.  With information provided by people that use the facilities), the ‘little’ can be ‘really freaking big so watch out else you are going to ram your boat into another boat or wall.’  Fortunately today the current was not large, though the wind was quite stiff.  Which made it fun, but not too interesting to get to Wally’s fuel dock for fuel and pump out.  Two notable things.  First was the nice Canadian Customs man who had little to do on this Sunday and came to check out our paperwork.  All good.  Second was that our gas mileage.  We have been burning 1 gal/hour on the trent.  But the last two top offs have been ridiculous on the lack of fuel we have needed in our tank.  Today our gas mileage was .44 gallons/hour.  Guess these sails really help!
After fuel dock, we headed back out to the channel so Jan could flip the fenders to the other side of the boat.  Then we turned back around and put out boat on the wall about 200 meters ahead of the fuel dock.  Fortunately the wall was not crowded.  Books say that Little Current usually is bustling, but this season it has been quiet and the wall has huge gaps which is GREAT for my docking skills.  Which have made a dramatic improvement in the past two months, but that doesn’t mean that they are actually, you know, like, good.  I’m going to invent reverse air bags for boats–when you get close to a dock and are coming in hot, these will blow up and prevent catastrophe!
We make it to the wall with relatively little drama.  Get hooked up.  And head off to grocery store for a weeks worth of food, head off to the laundry mat to clean out the dirty clothes, the package store for, you know, a package.  And then cook our rear ends off. Enchilada chicken for later this week.  Rice.  Butter chicken for tonight.  And grilled chicken for sandwiches.  Showers.  Walk dog.  And bask in the glow of the crappy 3G connectivity which is more than we have had for the past five days!!!
While we were shopping, I stopped back by Wally’s fuel dock to check out the ship’s store.  Wally’s was manned by three teen aged boy/men with absolutely no supervision.  They were a hoot.  When I walked in, the first question I was asked was “do you want to buy a fishing pole?”   To which my reply was no–already have one.  But undaunted, the young stud asked me no less than 10 times over the next 20 minutes if I wanted to buy a fishing pole.  When they realized that I was not going to buy a fishing pole, I got the hard sell on maps.  Would I like a map.  Nope…already have what I need.
Well–if I didn’t want to buy a map, would I like to LOOK at the maps and if so, could I count them.  Because they had to do inventory of the maps and would rather not count them if I was going to be looking at them anyways.
I declined.
Next was a sweatshirt.  Would I like to buy a sweatshirt that says “HAW” on the front in big letters.  When I asked what Haw meant, the reply was it was actually Haw Eaters and the ‘eaters’ was on the shirt sleeve.  And would I like to buy it for $125 Canadian.
So what is a Haw, I ask?
Turns out a Haw is a nickname for a berry found up here.  And according to the three young studs they:

  • Are super bitter
  • Dry your mouth out
  • Taste like sh!t (an exact quote)
  • Are protected by huge thorns
  • Hate them

BUT everyone here eats them and they are what this area is known for.  And you cannot be an authentic Haw Eater unless you are born on this island.  Which led the three of them into a quite long digression about who was from the island and who had the right to wear Haw Eater shirt.
All in all extremely amusing and what you would expect to see from three fine young gentlemen with all the time in the world and a transient population to mess with as they pass through.

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Sid checking out Little Current